Entries by tag: unformad

Is It Recoverable? Signs of Permanent and Reversible Data Loss
Me
madmannew
Is It Recoverable? Signs of Permanent and Reversible Data Loss
data-recovery-2 In the previous article, Permanent and Reversible Data Loss, we discussed the various situations that can lead to the loss of data. From practical point of view, it is essential to be able to tell one from another. It is very difficult to damage a modern storage device beyond repair (or, rather, beyond the point at which a data recovery operation is still possible). This article tries to give hints as to how particular situations can be successful handled in the most economical way. Read Full Article

Can I Unformat That Disk?
madmannew
News: File Uneraser: Get a lifetime license for free! / RaidLabs



One Day Only: Get a lifetime license for File Uneraser for free!

On February 24, 2013 we'll be giving away full, lifetime licenses for File Uneraser for absolutely free.

In addition, during the giveaway we'll be offering a 20% discount for all other products sold through raidlabs.com (and yes, that includes Raid Recovery!)

Do not forget to visit www.giveawayoftheday.com on February 24, 2013 to get your free license or obtain the discount!

Permanent and Reversible Data Loss
madmannew
Permanent and Reversible Data Loss
 

   In today’s world, information is the most valuable asset. Losing information may cause severe damages, sometimes unrecoverable. This is why organizations are trying to protect themselves against data loss as much as possible by building fault-tolerant systems, employing cloud computing for data storage and implementing complex backup systems. However, sometimes the inevitable happens, and information disappears from the most reliable storage. Understanding the costs and implications of data loss as well as realistically estimating the possibility of restoring the lost data is extremely important in corporate environments.
    Read Full Post    

Data Backups: Also Not a Perfect Panacea
madmannew
 The previous article discussed the principles and limitations of redundant RAID arrays used to build a fault-tolerant system. With RAID arrays not being a guarantee of data integrity, what is? Common belief is that regular backups are a perfect solution. Indeed, a carefully thought of and properly implemented backup policy will get you close to perfection – but not quite the absolute safety touted by backup apologists. This article discusses the benefits and limitations of regular backups in achieving the ultimate safety and accessibility of your data.
Local and Remote Backups

Backup systems located in the same office or in the same building are generally easier to build and less expensive to maintain. However, a backup system that’s physically close to the main workstation can easily suffer from the very same problem that caused data loss on the main PC. Floods, fires, electric surges and similar disasters may unfortunately affect the entire building – or even the whole city. While having a local backup server may still be a good idea as it offers easy accessibility and fast backup restoration, only having a local system is not enough.

See More at: http://www.recovery-portal.com/data-backups-also-not-a-perfect-panacea/#more-120

Redundant RAID Arrays: Not a Perfect Panacea
madmannew
Raid ArraysDesigning and implementing the optimum storage system is an often underestimated challenge even in large organizations storing and accessing humongous amounts of information. More often than not, companies implement a single RAID array, considering its redundancy a guarantee of data preservation. More often than not, this is not the case.

It is essential to realize that even a perfectly simple mirror array (RAID 1) will not protect against a number of events that will in time almost inevitably lead to loss of data. Logical errors, database and file corruption occur at a file system level, and will register on all of the disks comprising the mirror array at the same time. A RAID can only protect against an unexpected hardware failure occurring on the disk level, but will help you nothing against a logical data corruption or a hardware failure occurring on any level other than the actual disk (e.g. in a RAID controller)....

See More at: http://www.recovery-portal.com/redundant-raid-arrays-not-a-perfect-panacea/#more-117

HDD Recovery Pro Video PAD
madmannew
HDD Recovery Pro Video PAD


Can I Unformat That Disk?
madmannew
Data Recovery Software by The Undelete. NTFS Data Recovery Software,undelete data recovery,hard drives,file recovery,tools, best data recovery,recovery preview,undelete data,damaged ntfs recovery,recover data

Recovering CD and DVD Backups
Me
madmannew
 Recovering CD and DVD Backups

What could be more frustrating than reaching for a CD/DVD backup and discovering you can’t read the most important files? Don’t worry just yet; there are tools that can do more than Windows to read your files back. Read this article to learn more about the issue of optical backups, their fate and recovery...http://www.recovery-portal.com/recovering-cd-and-dvd-backups/#more-81


Can I Unformat a Memory Card?
madmannew


Part I and Part II of “Can I Unformat…?” articles present a detailed explanation of what happens when you format a memory card with a PC. From Windows point of view, memory cards are not much different to hard drives. Typically, memory cards formatted with “Quick format” are recoverable regardless of what version of Windows was used.

http://www.recovery-portal.com/can-i-unformat-a-memory-card/

Can I Unformat That Disk?
madmannew
As you can see from the table published in Part I of this article, formatting any type of media in Windows 95, 98, ME, NT4, Windows 2000 and Windows XP is never destructive. Indeed, these operating systems do not zero disk data even when performing the full format operation; instead, they verify the disk by simply reading the sectors instead of writing to them. This was changed in later versions of Windows to facilitate tighter security....
http://recovery-portal.com/can-i-unformat-that-disk-the-details/#more-58

?

Log in